E-commerce has allowed firms to establish a market presence, or to enhance an existing market position, by providing a cheaper and more efficient distribution chain for their products or services. One example of a firm that has successfully used e-commerce is Target. This mass retailer not only has physical stores, but also has an online store where the customer can buy everything from clothes to coffee makers to action figures.
Amazon, by contrast, is a primarily an e-commerce-based business that built up its operations around online purchases and shipments to consumers. Individual sellers can also engage in e-commerce, establishing shops on their own websites or through marketplaces such as eBay or Etsy. Such marketplaces, which gather multitudes of sellers, serve as platforms for these exchanges. The purchases are typically fulfilled by the private sellers, though some online marketplaces take on such responsibilities as well. E-commerce transactions are typically be done through a computer, a tablet, or a smartphone.
When changing platforms, you’ll have to re-upload all your images again into Shopify. With product details, see if your current ecommerce builder can export all your product details into a CSV file (sort of like Excel). If they can do that, you can upload the entire CSV file into your new Shopify store to save yourself a ton of time without having to setup all your products all over again.
Hello, I’m wondering if Shopify offers increments of units and multiple choices of units? I’m currently running an online fabric store on another website builder and I’m unhappy with the fact that I have to offer things by the centimetre. I’d rather offer by the metre – the normal way to buy fabric – and increments of 0.1 metre. Does Shopify offer that option?
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